How to Do a Balance Transfer with Chase

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Chase offers several good options for you to complete a balance transfer, whether you plan on doing so for personal debt or business debt. Our top pick is the Chase Slate® credit card because of its $0 intro fee on transfers made within 60 days of account opening, and 0% intro APR for 15 months.* This allows you to transfer your balance free of charge within the first 60 days of account opening. Choose from one of the following cards to enjoy a good intro period on your Chase balance transfer.

  Balance Transfer Intro Rate Balance Transfer Fee Ongoing APR
Chase Slate® credit card 0% intro APR for 15 months $0 intro fee on transfers made within 60 days of account opening. After that: either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater. 15.99%-24.74% Variable
Chase Freedom® 0% Intro APR on Balance Transfers for 15 months Either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater 15.99%- 24.74% Variable
Chase Freedom Unlimited® 0% Intro APR for 15 months Either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater 15.99%- 24.74% Variable
Ink Business Cash℠ Credit Card 0% for 12 Months Either $5 or 5% of the amount of each transfer, whichever is greater. 14.24% - 20.24% Variable

We recommend you also compare balance transfer cards from our partners to review alternative options. If you've decided that Chase is where you want to complete your balance transfer, read on for steps to complete your transfer online or over the phone.

How to complete a balance transfer with Chase

If you’ve made the decision to transfer your existing balance to Chase, follow these steps to complete your transfer online or over the phone.

Make sure you have this information handy:

  • Account number and balance of card with debt
  • Account information for your new Chase account

Important note: A balance transfer request made online and/or with a Customer Service Specialist cannot exceed $15,000 within any 30-day period.

Complete the transfer online

  1. Log in to your account. (If you haven’t created an account, you need to.)
  2. Click “Accounts”
  3. Select Chase balance transfer card listed below Accounts
  4. Click on “Things you can do” drop-down menu in top right corner
  5. Choose “Transfer a balance”
  6. Select the Chase balance transfer offer you have been approved for
  7. Click “Next” and your limit will be shown
  8. Input your information
    1. Account number of your card that has the balance
    2. Amount of the balance you want to transfer
  9. Click “Continue” to review and accept terms and conditions
  10. Submit your balance transfer request

Complete the transfer by phone

  1. Call the customer service number on the back of your credit card to speak with a Customer Service Specialist.
  2. Provide the credit card number of your card with the balance, as well as the amount you wish to transfer.
  3. Chase will make the payment for you.

What to look for in a good balance transfer card

  • No balance transfer fee. Most balance transfer cards come with a balance transfer fee of 2 - 5 percent of the transfer. The fee is often minor compared to the amount you save on interest during the intro period. If you can find a card without a transfer fee, you can save even more money.
  • Long 0% intro APR period. Regardless of how much debt you plan on transferring, a long intro period is key to providing you with the most time to pay off your balance. Some of the best balance transfer cards have intro periods over 15 months, with some cards offering as long as 24 months. You may still be fine with a shorter six-month intro period if you don’t have a large balance and are confident you can pay it off before the intro period ends.
  • Low ongoing APR after the intro period. Since you may not have the ability to pay off your transfer within the intro period, it’s a good idea to choose a card that offers a low ongoing APR. This will minimize the interest you accrue if you continue to carry a balance once the intro period is over.

3 keys for a successful balance transfer

  • Complete your transfer on time. Most balance transfer offers are only valid for a set amount of days from opening your card. Each card is different, and time periods typically are 30 days, but can range longer. Make sure to check the terms of your balance transfer so you don’t miss out.
  • Transfer your balance to a card from a different bank. Balance transfers only work between cards from different banks. So you can’t transfer a balance from one Capital One card to another Capital One card.
  • Be aware of the balance transfer fee. Most balance transfer cards charge you a percentage of your transferring balance. This amount of money you save on interest during the intro period often outweighs the balance transfer fee.

Is a balance transfer right for me?

A great way to see if a balance transfer is a good option for you is to use a tool like the Debt Repayment Calculator from LendingTree, the parent company of CompareCards, to see how much interest you are currently paying on your balance. Then, to find how much you would pay on your balance transfer (if there is a fee), simply multiply your balance by the balance transfer fee ($1,000 balance X 3% fee = $30 balance transfer fee). Subtracting the two will give you the amount of money you may or may not save by completing the transfer.

Let’s say you currently have a balance of $1,000 on a card with a 24.49% APR. You’re thinking of transferring your balance to a card with 0% APR for 12 months and a 3 percent balance transfer fee. You plan on paying $100 a month toward your balance. Here’s a breakdown of the fees or interest you will incur and the length of time it will take you to pay off your balance for both options:

  Cost (fees or interest) Length of time to pay off your balance
Balance Transfer Credit Card $30 10 months
Current Credit Card $130* 12 months*

Conclusion: Completing the balance transfer may save you $100* in interest payments, as long as you pay off your balance before the end of the intro period.

* Note that this amount is only an estimate.

How long will the balance transfer take?

Generally, Chase balance transfers take one to three weeks depending on how quickly the bank receiving the payment processes the transferred amount. Remember to stay current on your credit card payments with the bank that you're transferring the balance from, until your balance transfer has posted to your Chase account. This will prevent you from being charged any late fees.

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